How To Make Yoghurt At Home

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Please enjoy this article from guest blogger Natalie Ong, a local Urban Revolutionary. Natalie has had great success with an op-shop yoghurt maker (which is awesome if you can find one)! This method can also be done using a Culturing Flask such as this one from Urban Revolution. Enjoy this article and let us know your experience in the comments!

 

This is an easy technique for making yoghurt from scratch using an Easiyo yoghurt maker, based on recent blog posts from my Urban Eco Warrior Reviews Facebook page, with a method tweaked from various online recipes.

I had been looking to make yoghurt at home as a zero waste option as we go through a lot of plastic yoghurt tubs and you can only repurpose so many yoghurt tubs! I don't eat much yoghurt myself as I am lactose and casein intolerant, but my better half loves the stuff.

Mum used to make yoghurt at home with a yoghurt maker in the 1970s as ready-made yoghurt was not available. I was lucky enough to pick up a virtually brand new Easiyo from the op shop for $6. Bargain!

Yogurt maker with box

 

You will need:

  • One yoghurt maker with the jar* that comes with it. (They cost about $22 new from supermarkets or health food shops)
  • Powdered milk
  • Water
  • Some leftover yoghurt
  • Optional: powdered probiotic supplement

*Or a large screwtop glass jar that holds 1 litre of liquid.

 

Some online articles recommend bringing fresh full cream milk to the boil and letting it cool but I prefer the powdered milk option as it is a lot quicker and more economical.

Make up 1 litre of milk in the jar provided (Or screwtop glass jar equivalent) using 1.5 to 2 cups powdered milk and tap water (or use 750ml fresh full cream milk and add half cup powdered milk). Add 1 to 2 tablespoons leftover yoghurt and if you wish, probiotic powder from one capsule of probiotic supplement or equivalent probiotic powder. Stir or shake the mixture till completely dissolved.

Put the jar of milk, lid screwed firmly on, into the Easiyo yoghurt maker and pour boiling water into the vessel to firm a bath, following the Easiyo instructions. The water level should come up to just below the lid of the jar.

Screw on the lid of the yoghurt maker and set aside for 24 hours.

After 24 hours, you will have yoghurt. In colder weather it will take longer to form. If it's still a little runny after 24 hours, repeat the boiling water bath and set aside for another 24 hours.

Homemade yoghurt setup with yoghurt maker, jars and the final product Homemade yoghurt

 

The longer you leave the yoghurt in the bath, the firmer it will set, and it will get tangier in flavour. It will continue setting in the fridge. I prefer the firm-set texture after 3 days in the fridge.

Save some yoghurt from this batch for the next one and so on.  I have also tried using glass jars with varying degrees of success. Yoghurt is a natural fermented product so is subject to variations in conditions like temperature, microbial activity, milk concentration etc. So as with all adventures in home fermentation, be patient and keep tweaking and adapt your technique to seasonal variations.

There are some great tips in this recipe: https://sustainablesuburbia.net/how-to-make-yoghurt-from-scratch-in-an-easiyo-yogurt-maker

Thank you for reading and we hope you enjoyed! Let us know your thoughts in the comments; have you tried making yoghurt before? What has your experience been? What do you think of this method?

 

Our Culturing Flask from Urban Revolution is another great yoghurt-making vessel made from glass and stainless steel (pictured with our Wooden Jar Spoon).

Urban Revolution culturing flask for making yoghurt

Some other Urban Revolution products that might help with your DIY kitchen projects include our 1L jar (for preserves, fermentation, storage and more)stainless steel mini containers and our other DIY food kits (including cheese, chocolate, butter and more).

 

 

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